The embodiment of color perception

Neurotech@Berkeley
7 min readNov 15, 2022

Hermann von Helmholtz, a German physicist claimed that we do not have direct access to the world and its constituents (Patton, 2018). We can only access the events they lead to in our brains. For example, looking at the sky and realising that there is a full moon most notably involves processes of sensing the visual stimulus, perceiving the image so formed on our retina, recalling and recognizing it as a full moon, among others. Each of these processes, albeit related to an external object, are occuring inside our brains. Thus, ‘encapsulated by our body’, there is no way for us to escape and interact with the world outside of these bounds. Although, there has been quite a lot of debate around this perspective, specifically with the idea of an encapsulated brain, it inadvertently seems to support certain philosophical and psychological propositions of how humans experience life that ascribe a certain romance to the idea. To begin with, qualia is a term used to define a conscious experience that is by nature subjective and specific to each individual. Considering that we are in fact inside our skulls instead of the other way round, ‘we’ are the brain. It could then be argued that qualia result from the fact that we are only able to sense effects instead of external objects themselves. Further, this approach brings to mind the efficacy of the realisation that extends the experience of qualia to the fact that the…

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Neurotech@Berkeley

We write on psychology, ethics, neuroscience, and the newest in neural engineering. @UC Berkeley